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Utah Style and Design

Trad with a Twist: Refresh Your Fabrics with Updated Classics

May 30, 2017

Your first official act of spring: Refresh your fabrics. Designer Jason Wilde chooses seven updated classics and offers insight on what makes them new for today’s décor.

“We’re seeing a more traditional direction in design,” says Jason Wilde, principal of Harman Wilde Interior Design in SLC. But, he insists, this doesn’t mean stuffy, stiff or staid. “It’s comfortable, clean and authentic.” No more artificial stage-set interiors—no more exaggerated chevrons, heavy industrial elements or stark white-on-white décors. “Today’s look is like going home,” he says. “It feels comfortable and safe.” Boring? Not a chance. For proof, he offers seven reimagined classic fabrics and tips on what makes them perfect for the fresh new look of today’s traditional home.


1.
Houndstooth

“The exaggerated scale and bold coloration turns this menswear staple on its end,” says Wilde. “I’d definitely use it for draperies, and it would make amazing bedding.”

Echapee´ by Etamine

2. Chintz

“More contemporary colors like this acid green make chintz look new and fresh,” says Wilde. “When it comes to chintz, more sheen is more modern. And today, florals are bigger.”

Elizabeth by Schumacher

3. Plaid

A rift of plaid, this has a hand-drawn feel perfect for a light cotton, not a heavy wool. “It’s windowpane instead of Prince of Wales plaid,” Wilde says. “That makes it feel fresh, as do its colors.”

Lucas Check by Frederick Mason

4. Stripes

“Awning stripes are so expected, but a pinstripe is fresh and new,” Wilde explains. Crisply colored, this outdoor fabric is perfect for indoor use as well.

Stitch by Link Outdoor

5. Herringbone

First, it’s not chevron. It’s herringbone, Wilde emphatically points out. “It’s also embroidered and a natural for Mid-century to old-money Palm Beach.”

Tropical by No.9 Thompson

6. Lattice

“A relaxed textile and soft colors put a more casual spin on the classic trellis pattern,” says Wilde, who likes this renewed fabric for upholstering cushions, chairs or even a sofa. 

Parquet by Galbraith & Paul

7. Stripe of Birds

“Normally seen on chintz and among exploding floral patterns, birds look new on this fabric,” Wilde says. This pattern-type lets you add a trendy theme or motif to your décor without over-committing or breaking the bank, he adds. “This would be perfect for a custom kidney pillow.”

Birdsong by Chivasso

See more inside the Spring 2017 issue.

Utah Style & Design

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