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Utah Style and Design

Photo Friday: The New Old Town

September 7, 2018

Old Town Park City is coming out of a transition from the boho stomping grounds of seasonal resort workers to high-end living. While evident in remodels, new construction more dramatically drives home the point that Old Town Park City has changed.

Park City architect Jonathan DeGray recently commissioned me to photograph a home he designed on upper Norfolk with ski access connecting to the Town Lift. The design ties into Old Town’s historical mining past with the roof pitch, scale, and warm woods, while at the same time it announces modern credentials with concrete, metal, ample windows and disappearing glass doors.

Four levels stack the living space, and the two lowest levels have doors to the front and street. A tubular glass elevator and a wooden staircase with see-through risers connect the levels. Garage, media room and a bedroom at the base; home office, patio and two bedrooms on the next (shown above); main living with kitchen, rear yard, and ski entry on the third and the master suite privately occupying the top.

The main living area consumes almost the entire width of the third level, and opens from a large terrace at the front to the outdoor living to the rear. To the side are the stairs, elevator and a nook for a piano.

Eliminating hardware supports the kitchen’s sleek lines; cabinets open by pressing. To the rear of the cooking area are a butler’s pantry and the side ski entry.

The master suite received extra attention to detailing and luxuries, reminding me more of a hotel’s honeymoon suite.

The weather was inconsistent with breezes, showers, and residual smoke from the fires, inspiring patience, planning, and quick changes in the planned order of the photographs, but the camera-ready quality of the interiors added to the ease of the photo shoot.

I did spend some time shaking my head in disbelief at how Park City has changed. I lived in Old Town a long time ago when miners were my neighbors and I had to travel to Coalville to buy coal for heating. Enough said. Too many stories—I won’t bore you.

See more Photo Friday galleries here!

Scot Zimmerman
Architectural photographer Scot Zimmerman has been photographing exteriors and interiors of homes, and commercial and public buildings across the United States for over 37 years. He is the principal photographer of eight books; over 40 periodicals have featured his work; and 11 museums have exhibited his photos. He’s fond of adventuring in the Southern Utah desert.

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